Health Requirements

PEOPLE MAKE BETTER DECISIONS WITH ACCESS TO FACTS
We encourage clients to be informed before making commitments

WHY DO WE PROVIDE SUMMARISED INFORMATION?

To point you in the right direction

An informed decision is made when needs are defined and requirements, risks and obligations are understood.

Need any clarification? Talk with us…

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Who needs health examinations

You and family members who apply for a visa with you might need to have health examinations to prove you meet the health requirement.
You might need to have more health examinations if you come from a country where there are public health concerns such as polio or Ebola Virus Disease (EVD). Learn more about threats to public health.

Permanent and provisional visa applicants
Temporary visa applicants
Check if you need to have health examinations
You had health examinations in the last 12 months

Permanent and provisional visa applicants
You and any family members applying for the visa with you must have health examinations.
In some circumstances, family members who are not coming to Australia with you might also need to have health examinations.
Temporary visa applicants
You and any family members applying for a visa with you might need to have health examinations.
Whether you need them, and what examinations you need, depends on:
the visa you are applying for
how long you plan to stay in Australia
what you plan to do in Australia
the country you apply from
any special circumstances that might apply to you
whether you have any significant medical conditions

When you complete your medical history you will be given a referral letter containing an identifier we call a HAP ID. You need the HAP ID to arrange your health examinations.
Paper visa applications
Your case officer will contact you if you need to have health examinations. You will be given a referral letter containing an identifier we call a HAP ID. You need the HAP ID to arrange your health examinations.
See more about arranging your health examinations.
You had health examinations in the last 12 months
You might not need to have all the health examinations again if you had any in the last 12 months. Your referral letter will tell you what examinations you need to take.

When to have health examinations

​Depending on the visa you apply for, it might be best to wait until after you apply for a visa to have your health examinations. See the After you apply section to learn which visas this applies to.
Before you apply for a visa (My Health Declarations)
It can take several weeks to assess your health. We might ask you to have more health examinations depending on our assessment.
You might avoid delay by completing your health examinations before you apply for a visa through My Health Declarations (MHD).
MHD is a free service, but you must pay for any health examinations you have. You can include any family members you will include in your visa application when you use MHD.
Don’t use MHD if:
the visa you want to apply for is not listed there. This means you must apply for your visa before you have health examinations
you have already lodged a visa application. Wait until your case officer asks you to have health examinations and gives you your unique health assessment identifier, or HAP ID. If you don’t, you might delay processing of your visa application
the visa that you are intending to apply for can take more than 6 months to process
Your health examination results are generally only valid for a maximum of 12 months. If you have your health examinations before you apply for a visa that takes more than 6 months to process and there is a delay in processing your application, you might need to have more health examinations. You will have to pay to have the examinations again.

To use MHD:
Log into ImmiAccount.
Find the ‘My Health Declarations’ form.
Fill out the form and submit it.
After you submit the form, check for the ‘Organise health examinations’ link. If there is no ‘Organise health examinations’ link, you don’t need to have health examinations.
Follow the link and complete your medical history.
For more details, see our guidelines on completing the My Health Declarations form (400KB PDF). If you have any technical difficulties after following the guidelines, use our ImmiAccount Technical Support Form to contact us.
When you have completed your medical history, you will be provided a referral letter. The letter will contain your HAP ID. You need the HAP ID to arrange your health examinations.
You can reprint your referral letter if you need to. Access your My Health Declarations form again via ImmiAccount and click on the ‘Organise your health examinations’ link.
See more about arranging your health exams.
You will also be asked if you plan to apply for a permanent visa in the next 6 to 12 months and want to be assessed now for permanent stay. You will have to have more health examinations if you answer yes. You must pay for these health examinations.
If your circumstances change after you submit your MHD form and before you have completed your health examinations, let the panel clinic know when you to to your appointment.
Including your family when you use My Health Declarations
You can include family members on your My Health Declarations form. Don’t include any family members who are not migrating with you on the form. We will let you know if your non-migrating family members need to have health examinations after you apply for the visa.
After you apply for a visa
Wait until after you apply for one of these visas. We will tell you if you need health examinations.
Electronic Travel Authority (Subclass 601)
eVisitor (Subclass 651)
Humanitarian Stay (Temporary) visa (subclass 449)
Temporary (Humanitarian Concern) visa (subclass 786)
If you apply for one of the provisional visas listed in the left-hand column of this table, your visa processing officer or case officer will let you know if you need to have another health examination when you apply for the permanent visa on the right.
You had permanent health examinations for one of these visas
And you are now applying for this visa
Contributory Parent (Subclass 173 or 884)
Contributory parent (Subclass 143 or 864)
Skilled – Regional (Subclass 475, 487 or 489)
Skilled-regional (Subclass 887)
Business Innovation and Investment (Subclass 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165 or 188)
Skilled-sponsored (Subclass 888)

When to have health examinations

​Depending on the visa you apply for, it might be best to wait until after you apply for a visa to have your health examinations. See the After you apply section to learn which visas this applies to.
Before you apply for a visa (My Health Declarations)
It can take several weeks to assess your health. We might ask you to have more health examinations depending on our assessment.
You might avoid delay by completing your health examinations before you apply for a visa through My Health Declarations (MHD).
MHD is a free service, but you must pay for any health examinations you have. You can include any family members you will include in your visa application when you use MHD.
Don’t use MHD if:
the visa you want to apply for is not listed there. This means you must apply for your visa before you have health examinations
you have already lodged a visa application. Wait until your case officer asks you to have health examinations and gives you your unique health assessment identifier, or HAP ID. If you don’t, you might delay processing of your visa application
the visa that you are intending to apply for can take more than 6 months to process
Your health examination results are generally only valid for a maximum of 12 months. If you have your health examinations before you apply for a visa that takes more than 6 months to process and there is a delay in processing your application, you might need to have more health examinations. You will have to pay to have the examinations again.

To use MHD:
Log into ImmiAccount.
Find the ‘My Health Declarations’ form.
Fill out the form and submit it.
After you submit the form, check for the ‘Organise health examinations’ link. If there is no ‘Organise health examinations’ link, you don’t need to have health examinations.
Follow the link and complete your medical history.
For more details, see our guidelines on completing the My Health Declarations form (400KB PDF). If you have any technical difficulties after following the guidelines, use our ImmiAccount Technical Support Form to contact us.
When you have completed your medical history, you will be provided a referral letter. The letter will contain your HAP ID. You need the HAP ID to arrange your health examinations.
You can reprint your referral letter if you need to. Access your My Health Declarations form again via ImmiAccount and click on the ‘Organise your health examinations’ link.
See more about arranging your health exams.
You will also be asked if you plan to apply for a permanent visa in the next 6 to 12 months and want to be assessed now for permanent stay. You will have to have more health examinations if you answer yes. You must pay for these health examinations.
If your circumstances change after you submit your MHD form and before you have completed your health examinations, let the panel clinic know when you to to your appointment.
Including your family when you use My Health Declarations
You can include family members on your My Health Declarations form. Don’t include any family members who are not migrating with you on the form. We will let you know if your non-migrating family members need to have health examinations after you apply for the visa.
After you apply for a visa
Wait until after you apply for one of these visas. We will tell you if you need health examinations.
Electronic Travel Authority (Subclass 601)
eVisitor (Subclass 651)
Humanitarian Stay (Temporary) visa (subclass 449)
Temporary (Humanitarian Concern) visa (subclass 786)
If you apply for one of the provisional visas listed in the left-hand column of this table, your visa processing officer or case officer will let you know if you need to have another health examination when you apply for the permanent visa on the right.
You had permanent health examinations for one of these visas
And you are now applying for this visa
Contributory Parent (Subclass 173 or 884)
Contributory parent (Subclass 143 or 864)
Skilled – Regional (Subclass 475, 487 or 489)
Skilled-regional (Subclass 887)
Business Innovation and Investment (Subclass 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165 or 188)

Arrange your health examinations

We may ask you to have health examinations. If we do, we will give you:

a list of the examinations you must have
an identifier we call a HAP ID

You will need the HAP ID to make an appointment for your health examinations.
In Australia
Arrange your health examinations with our migration medical services provider, Bupa Medical Visa Services.
Book your examinations online at Bupa Medical Visa Services.
Call 1300 794 919 to arrange your health examinations if:
you do not have internet access, or
you need to arrange a Carer visa assessment, or
you need to arrange a fitness to depart or travel assessment
Outside Australia
You must be examined by one of the Department’s approved panel physicians or clinics.
A panel physician is a doctor or radiologist appointed by the department to do health examinations outside Australia at an approved clinic.
See how to contact a panel physician by finding the immigration office nearest to you.

Your health examinations appointment

What to bring to the appointment
eMedical
Cost
What you do not have to pay
If you do not have a valid passport

What to bring to the appointment
When you go to your appointment, bring:
a valid passport
your HAP ID
If you lodged a paper visa application your HAP ID is in your Health Examination List (or the equivalent document we provided you).
If you lodged your visa application online, your HAP ID is in the referral letter you downloaded when you applied.
The clinic can’t locate your case in eMedical without your HAP ID.
Also bring:
your prescription spectacles or contact lenses, if you have any
any existing specialist or other medical reports for known medical conditions
any previous chest x-rays
Bring your polio vaccination certificate to your appointment if you are applying from outside Australia and since 5 May 2014, you have you have spent 28 or more days in any country (or any combination of countries) where there is endemic or outbreak polio. If you don’t bring your certificate, we might ask you for it separately. This could delay your application.
eMedical
We process Australian immigration health examinations through our electronic health processing system, eMedical.
eMedical stores information about clients having health examinations for an Australian visa application. Panel physicians and clinic staff can save your medical history, digital photos and x-rays and your examination results to eMedical, removing the need for paper-based examination reports. Health information submitted via eMedical reaches the Department instantly, avoiding the delay of sending paper-based reports to Australia.
To find an clinic near you that uses eMedical, look for the eMedical logo next to the clinic’s name on our offices and locations page.
In countries where eMedical is available, you must submit your examination results electronically, unless exceptions apply
Anyone with a HAP ID can use eMedical to see if and when their examination results were submitted to the Department. If you submitted a paper application, use this link to access eMedical client.
If eMedical is not available at the examining clinic
If you are having your health examinations at a clinic that does not use eMedical, download and print the forms below and bring them to your appointment.
Form 26 Medical examination for an Australian visa (251KB PDF)
Form 160 Radiological report on chest x-ray of an applicant for an Australian visa (282KB PDF)
Cost
You are responsible for paying any costs to do with your health examinations, including the cost of:
the examining physician or radiologists
any special tests, investigations or treatment needed
any specialists you need to see
courier fees
What you do not have to pay
You don’t have to pay for your health examinations if you are an accepted Refugee or Special Humanitarian Program applicant (subclass 200, 201, 202, 203 or 204). If your application was lodged under the Community Proposal Pilot, the Approved Proposing Organisation is responsible for paying any costs associated with your health examination.
The cost of health examinations outside Australia varies from country to country. But you can expect the costs will be similar to those you would pay locally for a comprehensive examination or report by a qualified medical practitioner. Contact the clinic before your appointment to ask about the cost.
See more about health examinations costs in Australia from Bupa Medical Visa Services.
If you do not have a valid passport
Applicants in Australia
Ask your case officer for advice if you have already lodged a visa application and don’t have a valid passport.
Wait until you have lodged a visa application to have your health examinations if you haven’t yet lodged a visa application and don’t have a valid passport.
Applicants outside Australia
You must wait until you have lodged a visa application to have your health examinations if you are:
in a country where examinations are recorded electronically using eMedical
and
you have not yet lodged a visa
and
you don’t have a valid passport
We will accept one of these combinations of documents as an alternative to a valid passport:
a National Identity Card and a photocopy of your passport photo page, certified by us or by an Australian Visa Application Centre (AVAC)
a referral letter listing your examinations and a copy of your passport photo page certified by us or an AVAC
a referral letter listing your examinations and a photograph attached together with stamp/seal from us
a National Identity Card and a referral letter listing your examinations
We only accept National Identity Cards from these countries:
Albania
Argentina
Austria
Bahrain
Belgium
Bosnia
Brazil
Bulgaria
Canada
China (where verified by ID5)
Croatia
Czech Republic
Egypt
Estonia
France
FYROM
Germany
Hong Kong
Hungary
Indonesia
Italy
Kosovo
Kuwait
Latvia
Lithuania
Macau
Malaysia
Malta
Montenegro
Netherlands
Oman
Pakistan
Poland
Portugal
Qatar
Russia (Russian internal passports are considered equivalent to a National Identity Card)
Romania
Singapore
Saudi Arabia
Serbia
Slovakia
Slovenia
South Korea
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Taiwan
Thailand
Turkey
United Arab Emirates (UAE)
If you can’t provide acceptable alternative documents
We mightaccept other identity documents if you don’t have a passport or other approved alternative document. But you must contact your visa processing officer for advice before you make an appointment to have your health examinations.
Permanent visa applicants who have a family member who is not migrating to Australia must provide at least 2 forms of identification. At least one must include a photograph such as:
a birth certificate
school registration documents
a student card

After your health examinations

After your health examinations, the panel physician who examines you:
records the results, and
makes a recommendation to us about your health status
The panel physician will not tell you whether they think you meet the health requirement. The panel clinic submits the results and recommendation to us for assessment. You will either:
meet the health requirement, or
your case will be sent to a Medical Officer of the Commonwealth (MOC) for their opinion
The MOC might ask you to:
provide more information
have more health examinations
Results
If you used My Health Declarations, we will not tell you the outcome of your health examinations until you apply for a visa. You will be able to see information about your health assessment processing in ImmiAccount if you applied online by clicking ‘View health assessment’ in the ‘View application status’ section.
We cannot tell you anything about the results of your health examinations until the panel clinic has submitted them. The panel clinic can tell you if they have submitted your health examination results to the department.
Contact the visa officer assigned to your case if you have any questions about your health examination results after your health examination has been submitted.
Outcomes
Your case may be cleared without referral to a MOC if your results show you have no significant health conditions.
If your case is referred, the MOC will assess it and let us know if:
you meet the health requirement, or
you will meet the health requirement if you sign a health undertaking, or
you don’t meet the health requirement
If you don’t meet the health requirement, we will not grant you a visa unless a health waiver is available and exercised.
Validity
The results of your health assessment are usually valid for 12 months. If we ask you to sign a health undertaking, they are valid for 6 months.
More health examinations
Depending on our assessment of your health, we might ask you to have more health examinations. Your visa processing officer will let you know after you lodge your visa application.

Health undertaking

​A health undertaking is an agreement you make with the Australian Government to meet the health requirement. A health undertaking helps us ensure that you follow up any significant health conditions with an onshore health provider if you need to.
Who must sign a health undertaking
We may ask you to sign a health undertaking if you have a significant health condition and:
you had your health examinations outside Australia, or
you apply for a protection visa
We usually ask you to sign a health undertaking if you are at increased risk of developing active tuberculosis. For example, you might:
have previously been treated for tuberculosis, or
the chest x-ray you had during your health examinations is abnormal
We may also ask you to sign a health undertaking if you have another significant health condition such as:
tuberculosis
HIV
hepatitis B or C
Hansen’s disease
If you do not sign a health undertaking when we ask you to, we will not grant you a visa.
How to sign a health undertaking
Your visa processing officer will let you know if we need you to sign a health undertaking.
You will need to complete and sign the health undertaking form (160KB PDF).
This form is available in the following languages:
Language
Form number
Arabic
815ara (307KB PDF)
Chinese Simplified
815chs (462KB PDF)
Dari
815dar (303KB PDF)
Farsi
815far (320KB PDF)
French
815fre (263KB PDF)
Hindi
815hin (319KB PDF)
Indonesian
815ind (259KB PDF)
Khmer
815khm (294KB PDF)
Korean
815kor (381KB PDF)
Kurdish
815kur (304KB PDF)
Myanmar language (formerly Burmese)
815mya (297KB PDF)
Pashto
815pas (308KB PDF)
Spanish
815spa (259KB PDF)
Swahili
815swa (256KB PDF)
Tamil
815tam (304KB PDF)
Thai
815tha (226KB PDF)
Vietnamese
815vie (292KB PDF)
What you must do once you have signed
When you sign a health undertaking, you agree that within 28 days of arriving in Australia you will contact our migration medical services provider, Bupa Medical Visa Services (BUPA), or call 1300 794 919 (Monday to Friday 9 am to 5 pm AEST).
By signing a health undertaking you agree to:
attend an appointment with a state or territory health clinic in Australia (where required – Bupa will provide you with this information), and
complete any further investigation or course of treatment required
Ensure you keep a copy of your completed form. It contains important information to help you complete the health undertaking process.
Protection visa applicants must contact BUPA within 28 days of receiving a Request for Information letter. If we ask you to, you must also attend an appointment with a health clinic in Australia.
Pregnancy health undertakings for protection visa applicants
If you are a protection visa applicant and do not elect to have a chest x-ray while pregnant, you must sign a pregnancy health undertaking that you will have one after birth. You must contact BUPA when you receive your equest for Information letter and arrange to have your chest x-ray examination.​

Health waivers

Overview
How we exercise health waivers
Health waiver outcomes

Overview
We might be able to exercise a health waiver for applicants for some visa subclasses if a Medical Officer of the Commonwealth (MOC) finds they don’t meet the health requirement.
You must first meet all other eligibility criteria for the visa. We must then be satisfied that granting you the visa is unlikely to:
result in a significant cost to the community
prevent Australian citizens from accessing health care or community services in short supply
We can’t exercise a health waiver if you fail to meet the health requirement because:
you have active tuberculosis
your condition might pose a danger to the community or is a threat to public health
See more about significant costs and services in short supply.
How we exercise health waivers
You can’t apply for a health waiver. Your visa officer will contact you to let you know you have not met the health requirements but a waiver might be considered.
We will ask you to:
give us more information about why a health waiver should be exercised
complete a formal submission template telling us why we should exercise a health waiver
We consider each waiver on a case-by-case basis. We will consider a number of factors when we decide to exercise a health waiver, including:
whether you or any of your family members can lessen the potential cost of your condition and your reliance on our health care and community services, and
any compassionate and compelling circumstances that support exercising a health waiver for you
Temporary Work (Skilled) (subclass 457) visa applicants
Subclass 457 was closed to new applications on 18 March 2018. If you or any members of the family unit applied for a subclass 457 visa before this date, we can exercise a health waiver under Public Interest Criterion 4006A if:
you or someone applying for the visa with you doesn’t meet the health requirement due to the likelihood it will cause significant cost to the community or prevent Australian citizens accessing health care or community services in short supply
your Australian employer undertakes to meet all costs related to the health condition that caused you or someone applying for the visa with you to fail to meet the health requirement
If you applied for a Temporary Skill Shortage (subclass 482) visa on or after 18 March 2018 as the family member of a person who already holds a Subclass 457 visa, we will assess your health waiver under Public Interest Criterion 4007.
Health waiver outcomes
We will continue processing your visa application if we exercise a health waiver.
We will refuse your visa application if we don’t exercise a health waiver. Your visa officer will let you know if this is the case.

Protecting health care and community services

Significant healthcare and community service costs
When determining if you meet the health requirement, a Medical Officer of the Commonwealth (MOC) considers whether you have a health condition that will be a significant cost to the Australian community in terms of the health care or community services required to manage your condition.
We use per capita data about health and community service costs to work out what your condition is likely to cost over a period of time:
for temporary visa applicants, this is your period of stay
for permanent visa applicants this is generally 5 years, or 3 years if you are aged 75 or older
If you have a permanent or ongoing condition with a reasonably predictable course, the MOC will estimate what your condition will cost the community over your remaining life expectancy.
Having a disease or health condition does not always mean you will not meet the health requirement due to significant costs. The likely costs will depend on what kind of disease or condition you have and how severe it is.
We will not grant you a visa if you do not meet the health requirement because your condition is likely to be a significant cost, unless a health waiver is available and exercised.
We regard costs of AUD40,000 or more to be significant.
The 5 most conditions most commonly identified as affecting permanent visa applicants who have failed the health requirement are:
intellectual impairment
HIV infection
functional impairment
renal disease or failure
cancer
Safeguarding access to health care and services
When the MOC determines whether you meet the health requirement, they will consider whether your condition is likely to prevent Australian citizens or permanent residents accessing health care or community services in short supply. We call this ‘prejudicing access’ to these services.
We take advice from the Department of Health on which health care and community services are in short supply. Examples include:
organ transplants
dialysis
The Department can consider exercising a health waiver for some visas where we are satisfied that granting the visa would be unlikely to:
result in significant cost to the Australian community, or
prejudice the access of Australian citizens or permanent residents to health care or community services in short supply

Threats to public health

You must meet the health requirement so we know you do not pose a risk to public health or endanger the Australian community.

Tuberculosis
HIV and hepatitis
Yellow fever
Polio
Ebola Virus Disease (EVD)

Tuberculosis
The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared tuberculosis an epidemic and a global emergency.
Permanent visa applicants will be tested for tuberculosis as part of the visa application process.
Temporary visa applicants might be asked to take a test for tuberculosis if we think there is a risk. See what health examinations you might need.
Tuberculosis testing
Active tuberculosis is the most infectious form of the disease and is the greatest threat to public health. We are most likely to test you for active tuberculosis as part of the immigration process.
Visa applicants aged 11 years and over must have a chest x-ray for evidence of active tuberculosis. There are alternative tuberculosis testing arrangements for applicants aged 2 or more and under 11 from countries with a higher risk of tuberculosis.
Evidence of tuberculosis
If your chest x-ray or other test shows evidence of possible tuberculosis, we will ask you to have more health examinations to see whether you have active tuberculosis.
If you have active tuberculosis we can’t grant you a visa until you have received treatment and a Medical Officer of the Commonwealth (MOC) has found you are free of it.
You might still meet the health requirement if we find you have inactive tuberculosis, but we might ask you to sign a health undertaking.
HIV and hepatitis
You must have an HIV test if you are 15 or older and:
you are applying for a permanent visa, or
you want to work as (or study to become) a doctor, nurse, dentist or paramedic in Australia
You must have an HIV test if you are younger than 15, applying for an adoption or other permanent visa, and:
you have a history of blood transfusions, or
there is any clinical indication that you might be HIV positive, or
your biological mother is or was HIV positive
You must have a hepatitis test if you are:
pregnant, or
applying for an adoption visa, or
applying for a humanitarian or protection visa, or
an unaccompanied refugee minor, or
intending to work as (or to study to become) a doctor, nurse, dentist or paramedic in Australia
Evidence of HIV or hepatitis
We generally don’t consider HIV or hepatitis to be a threat to public health.
But if you have HIV or hepatitis and you apply for a temporary visa, we might consider your condition to be a threat to public health if you:
plan to work as a doctor, dentist, nurse or paramedic in Australia
have a certain level of viral load
intend to undertake procedures where there is a risk of contact between the worker’s blood and the patients open tissue.
Otherwise you will only be assessed by a MOC to determine whether your condition would:
result in significant healthcare or community service costs, or
prejudice the access of Australian citizens and permanent residents to services in short supply
See more about significant costs and services in short supply.
Yellow fever
We strongly encourage applicants to get an international vaccination certificate if:
they are aged one or older
they stayed overnight or longer in a yellow fever-declared country within 6 days before arriving in Australia
Learn more about yellow fever from the Department of Health.
Polio
Polio is a highly infectious virus that invades the nervous system.
On 5 May 2014, the World Health Organisation (WHO) declared the transmission of wild poliovirus a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.
Vaccination coverage for polio in Australia is high, so the risk of the disease spreading is considered low. However, it is important to take measures to reduce the risk of the virus spreading further.
You may be required to provide a polio vaccination certificate if you are travelling from one of the relevant countries on the ‘Where we work’ tab on the Global Polio Eradication Initiative website. You will be advised by a visa officer if you are required to provide a polio vaccination certificate.
If you are required to provide a polio vaccination certificate, bring your certificate to your appointment with our panel physician.
Learn more about polio from the Department of Health.
Ebola Virus Disease (EVD)
The WHO announced in December 2015 that all countries previously affected by the Ebola virus were Ebola free.
The Australian Government consequently relaxed border screening measures at Australia’s international airports and seaports.
There are no special requirements for entering Australia if you travel from a country previously listed as Ebola affected.

Adequate health insurance for visa holders

You are financially responsible for any health debts you incur in Australia. We might consider any outstanding health debts you have if you apply for a visa in future.
If you are not eligible for Medicare, any treatment you have in a hospital or emergency room will be as a private patient. Most temporary visa holders are not eligible for Medicare.
For routine medical treatment in Australia, out-of-hospital treatment from a general practitioner is normally the most cost-effective solution.
We offer a guide to the minimum level of health cover that will mitigate your financial risk but your healthcare costs are unlikely to be covered completely. You will still be liable for the balance of your healthcare costs.
Consider whether a higher level of cover than we specify here might be more suitable for you.
You can be charged a patient contribution, excess or co-payment for treatment by either or both:
your insurance fund
any hospital you are treated at
Benefit levels
You should get cover that provides benefits at least equivalent to the following.
Public hospital
For admitted patient treatment, a benefit equal to the state and territory health authority gazetted rates for ineligible patients for:
overnight and day only hospital accommodation (all costs including: all theatre, intensive care, labour wards, ward drugs)
emergency department fees that lead to an admission
admitted patient care and postoperative services that are a continuation of care associated with an early discharge from hospital
This includes all admitted treatments covered by the Medicare Benefit Schedule (MBS).
Surgically implanted prostheses
For no-gap prostheses and gap-permitted prostheses as listed in the Private Health Insurance (Prostheses) Rules 2007, a benefit at least equal to 100 per cent of the minimum benefit amount listed.
Pharmacy
For all PBS-listed drugs, prescribed according to PBS-approved indications, that are administered during and form part of an admitted episode of care, a benefit equal to the PBS-listed price in excess of the patient contribution.
This includes the cost of PBS-listed drugs administered post-discharge if they form part of the admitted episode of care.
Medical services
For admitted medical services with an MBS item number, 100 per cent of the Medical Benefits Schedule fee or less if the patient is charged less.
Ambulance services
100 per cent of the charge not otherwise covered by third-party arrangements for transport by ambulance provided by, or under an arrangement with, a government-approved ambulance service when medically necessary for admission to hospital, emergency treatment onsite, or inter-hospital transfer for emergency treatment.
This includes inter-hospital transfers that are necessary because the original admitting hospital does not have the required clinical facilities. It does not extend to transfers due to patient preferences.
Informed financial consent
The insurer will allow hospitals to check members’ eligibility so members are able to give informed financial consent when they are admitted.
Waiting periods
To comply with the minimum level, the only waiting periods that can be applied are:
12 months for pregnancy related conditions
12 months for pre-existing conditions applied in a way that is consistent with Section 75-15 of the Private Health Insurance Act 2007
2 months for psychiatric, rehabilitation and palliative care, whether or not the condition is pre-existing
Excluded treatments
To comply with the minimum level of health insurance, the only admitted patient treatments that may be excluded are:
assisted reproductive treatments
elective cosmetic treatments
stem cells, bone marrow and organ transplant
Insurance policies may also exclude:
treatment provided outside Australia, including necessary treatment en route to or from Australia
treatment arranged in advance of the insured’s arrival in Australia
services and treatment which are covered by compensation or damages provisions of any kind
Insurers don’t have to exclude these treatments. They can choose to cover them or not.
Global annual benefit limits
To comply with the minimum level of health insurance, the per-person, per-annum benefit must not be less than AUD1,000,000.
Out-of-hospital cover
For treatment that relates to medical services with an MBS item number, cover up to the Medical Benefits Schedule fee.
Except where otherwise stated, the insurer can decide whether to provide cover for out-of-hospital treatment. The insured person can choose to purchase this additional cover or not.
Excess, co-payment or patient contribution
The insurer can decide to charge an excess, co-payment or patient contribution. Excess, co-payment and patient contributions can be charged on either an annual or per-separation basis.
Portability
When determining waiting periods, insurers must recognise previous length of membership on a policy held with another Australian insurer that meets the minimum standards.
That is:
when transferring between Australia-based insurers where the customer has been a member of the previous fund for more than 12 months, waiting periods of no longer than 12 months will apply to the higher level of benefits
when transferring between Australia-based insurers where the customer has been a member of the previous fund for less than 12 months, any unserved waiting periods must be completed with the new fund. If increasing the level of cover or benefits, further waiting periods of no longer than 12 months will apply to the higher level of benefits. These waiting periods are to be served concurrently
To comply with the minimum level of health insurance, the insurer must agree to:
grant a member who transfers between Australia-based insurers continuity of cover for up to 30 days from the date they leave their previous insurer
provide members who terminate their policy with a clearance certificate, approved by the Department of Home Affairs, within 14 days of the termination date or the date they were notified of the termination, whichever is later
Buy-out clauses
To comply with the minimum level of health insurance, a policy must not contain a buy-out clause that would have the effect of terminating the insurer’s liabilities in exchange for a predetermined lump sum payment.
Arrears
The insurer will allow the insured person 60 days from the last financial date of membership to pay a premium without terminating the membership.
Insurers do not have to pay for treatment received during any arrears period until and unless the arrears are paid for the relevant period.
Evidence of adequate health insurance
Some visas require you to provide evidence of adequate health insurance before we grant the visa.
We might ask you to provide a copy of a health insurance policy for you and any additional applicants applying for the visa with you. Check the requirements of the visa you are applying for.

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Information source: Australian Government – Department of Home Affairs